Hurricane Ophelia meandering in the Atlantic

Hurricane Ophelia meandering in the Atlantic

Hurricane Ophelia meandering in the Atlantic

Way out in the middle of the Atlantic, it's unlikely it will be a threat to US, although it could possibly be a threat to Ireland, the National Hurricane Center said. That's a bit of an unusual track for Atlantic storms.

The center of the storm will remain well offshore but high wind, heavy rain, and damaging surf will all be possible along the Iberian Peninsula.

Hurricane season runs from June 1 through November.

The Met Office has issued a Yellow Warning for the tail end of Hurricane Ophelia which is set to hit Northern Ireland on Monday. Seemingly every thunderstorm complex in the basin turned into a hurricane over the past two months, with many undergoing "rapid intensification" and reaching the top levels of the Saffir-Simpson scale. The last time a season produced 10 consecutive hurricanes was in 1893, according to Colorado State University meteorologist Phil Klotzbach - a period when tracking hurricanes largely relied on ships and barometric readings.


Ophelia is forecast to drift northeast through today and to pass just south of the Azores into the weekend.

She then moves further northeast then north off the coast of Portugal and Spain.

Its interaction with colder water and the jet stream means Opehlia will likely lose its tropical characteristics before reaching Ireland and the United Kingdom, becoming a post-tropical (also called extra-tropical) storm.

The compact weather system which will arrive on Monday afternoon and will continue into the early hours of Tuesday morning, is the first notable storm of the year to reach Irish shores.

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