Facebook wants to fight revenge porn by seeing your nudes

Facebook wants to fight revenge porn by seeing your nudes

Facebook wants to fight revenge porn by seeing your nudes

Facebook is asking users who are anxious about their photos being exposed on Instagram or Facebook to contact the e-Safety Commissioner, Julie Inman Grant, and to send their own nudes to themselves on Facebook Messenger. "If someone fears they are at risk of revenge porn, they can contact e-Safety", they explained. The organization will then tell you to send the image to yourself on Messenger.

"This partnership gives Australians a unique opportunity to proactively inoculate themselves from future image-based abuse by coming to our portal and reporting tool", said Julie Inman Grant, Australia's eSafety Commissioner, in a statement.

Facebook will then put a digital fingerprint on the image and will block the sensitive image from appearing if someone tries to upload that same image to Facebook or Instagram.

The process is meant to stop the image ever appearing on Facebook, whoever tries to upload it, by using the Facebook AI technologies used in photo and face matching on the social platform.

The new program is being tested in Australia where Facebook is partnering with a small government agency called e-Safety to curb sexual images from being shared without permission. They are asking anyone who is concerned their nude images might be shared on the social media platform [VIDEO] to send them the images.


Back in May, Facebook announced it was hiring thousands of new employees who will be specifically tasked with monitoring and removing flagged posts.

The headlines are enough to keep you scratching your head, but Facebook says it's for a good cause and could keep you safe later. Once a picture has been removed, photo-matching technology is used to ensure the image isn't uploaded again.

So if hackers were able to access this information from Facebook, Thompson said all they would see is a bunch of numbers that would be meaningless. Nonetheless, Alex Stamos, Facebook chief security officer, said the company was improving its software in order to prevent such circumvention. Consensual nude photos. You know what's cooler?

Facebook is now testing the system - starting in Australia, but spreading to other parts of the world - but it's not really clear how willing potential revenge porn victims will be to go along with the scheme.

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