Fidget Spinners Sold At Target Contain Lead

Fidget Spinners Sold At Target Contain Lead

Fidget Spinners Sold At Target Contain Lead

Fidget spinners are one of the hottest new trends of the year, but ahead of the holiday shopping season, a new report by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group, a consumer advocacy organization, says testing found risky levels of lead in some.

A consumer group is warning that two models of fidget spinners being sold at Target contain high levels of lead that may be harmful to children.

The Target page for Fidget Wild Spinner Premium Brass does indeed say it's for people 14 and older, though The Washington Post reported that the fidget spinner's manufacturer labeled them for anyone at least six years old.

Tamara Rubin, the Portland mother-of-four behind the popular Facebook group "Lead Safe Mama", said she tested her kids' fidget spinners with an X-ray spectrometer. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission requires all children's products to not exceed a total lead content level of 100 ppm.

Both Target and the manufacturer say the items are still on the shelves because the spinners are not meant to be children's toys. "So, Target needs to immediately stop selling the toys that contain high amounts of lead, and issue a recall for those that they've already sold". "As a result, the fidget spinners identified are not regulated as toys or children's products and are not required to meet children's product standards".

Fidget spinners are categorized as "general use" products rather than children's toys, so they are not subject to the lead limits normally applied to children's toys and overseen by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.


Harold Chizick, spokesman for Bulls-I-Toys of Des Moines, Iowa, the items' distributor, said in a statement: "Safety is one of our top priorities".

"All fidget spinners have play value as children's toys regardless of labeling", Cook-Shultz said.

Two of those came back with high levels of lead.

"While these two products comply with all CPSC guidelines for fidget spinners, based on the concerns raised, we're removing them from our assortment", said Jenna Reck, senior communications manager at Target.

Dr. Alan Woolf, a pediatrics professor at Harvard Medical School and a member of the AAP's committee on environmental health, told ABC News the test results were concerning, especially because the spinners are attractive to young children.

Fidget spinners are palm-sized toys for adults and kids alike featuring a whirling center.

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