USA hate crimes rose during fierce 2016 election, Federal Bureau of Investigation stats show

USA hate crimes rose during fierce 2016 election, Federal Bureau of Investigation stats show

USA hate crimes rose during fierce 2016 election, Federal Bureau of Investigation stats show

The FBI released its 2016 hate crime statistics report Monday.

There were 40 hate crimes reported in the state past year, the highest number of bias-related incidents since 2010.

Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, said the increase in hate crimes nationally reflects an increase in hate crimes around the 2016 presidential election, a big increase in some large jurisdictions, a sustained level of crimes against large groups including African Americans who have always been the the top target of hate crimes, and a jump in crimes against Latinos, whites, Muslims and transgender people.

Hate crimes in Maryland, however, have decreased 14 percent, according to the data.

Of those crimes a year ago, 25 were motivated by race, two by religion, and 12 by sexual orientation. The majority of victims were targeted due to their race or ethnicity, the report says, with crimes against African-Americans by far the largest share in that category.

The rise marked the first time since 2004 that hate crime in the United States has increased two years in a row.

Experts caution there is a big caveat with Federal Bureau of Investigation data: It's based on voluntary reporting from more than 15,000 police agencies across the country.


These numbers correlate with the NCAVP's recent report. And the number of anti-Muslim groups almost tripled, to 101 past year, from 34 in 2015, the SPLC said.

He won the white vote by a 21 percentage point margin over Clinton, while she captured black voters by an 80 point spread and Hispanic voters by 36 points.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the task force he appointed on crime reduction is exploring ways to revise training for police and prosecutors, and to improve data collection on hate crimes.

"No person should have to fear being violently attacked because of who they are, what they believe, of how they worship", said Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a statement after the report was published on November 13, The Washington Post reports.

Incidents targeting Jews increased from 664 incidents in 2015 to 684 incidents in 2016.

There were 1,273 crimes based on religion. Crimes motivated by gender identity-bias accounted for 124 incidents.

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