Aid workers to return to Yemen at weekend but no aid yet

Aid workers to return to Yemen at weekend but no aid yet

Aid workers to return to Yemen at weekend but no aid yet

The airport in the capital of Sanaa will reopen to United Nations aircraft, and the seaport of Hodeida will be able to receive urgent humanitarian aid, the coalition statement said.

Saudi Arabia tightened a blockade on Yemen earlier this month after Iran-backed Houthi rebels in the country fired a rocket deep into the conservative Sunni Muslim country.

He says that "at a time of starvation and a time of cholera, it's very important" to keep all aid channels open.

The Saudi-led coalition fighting rebels in Yemen has pledged to reopen the country's main airport, as well as two main ports.

About 7 million people in Yemen, out of a population of 27 million, depend entirely on food aid, and 4 million rely on aid groups for clean water.


The coalition sys the United Nations and worldwide relief groups have demanded the coalition allow full access to hubs in Yemen so that humanitarian aid can reach those that desperately need it.

United Nations aid chief Mark Lowcock called on November 8 for the blockade to be lifted, warning that Yemen would otherwise face "the largest starvation the world has seen for decades".

Aid group Save the Children welcomed the coalition's announcement but warned that it was "nowhere near enough to avert a potential starvation in Yemen".

The U.N. humanitarian chief in Yemen says the closure of the country's main airport and two seaports by a Saudi-led coalition has threatened gains made in containing cholera and the risk of starvation in the war-torn country. They also suggested Sanaa Airport would be allowed to reopen, though since they bombed the airport recently, it's not clear it's capable of reopening. The missile was shot down, but it was the farthest a projectile fired by Yemen's Shiite rebels, also known as the Houthis, had travelled into the kingdom.

Yemen's civil war has been raging since 2015, with the Houthis, a group largely composed of the Zaidi Shia minority, stormed Sanaa and deposed the internationally recognised president, Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. More than 2,200 people have died.

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