Some E-Cigarette Coils May Leach Lead, Other Toxins Into The Vapor

Some E-Cigarette Coils May Leach Lead, Other Toxins Into The Vapor

Some E-Cigarette Coils May Leach Lead, Other Toxins Into The Vapor

"It's important for the FDA, the e-cigarette companies and vapers themselves to know that these heating coils, as now made, seem to be leaking toxic metals, which then get into the aerosols that vapers inhale", says senior researcher Ana María Rule, assistant scientist in environmental health and engineering in Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. The aerosol is created after an electric current produced by a battery passes through a metal coil, which then heats nicotine-based liquids. The researchers say chronic exposure to the metals has been linked to lung, brain and heart damage, as well as cancer.

In the study, the scientists examined e-cigarette devices owned by a sample of 56 users.

And while e-liquid might not carry unsafe metals on its own, the team found just under a fifth of the samples had significant levels of another highly toxic element: arsenic.

In the aerosol samples, nearly 50 percent of them had lead concentrations higher than health-based limits defined by the Environmental Protection Agency. However, the source of the lead still remains a mystery.

"...These heating coils, as now made, seem to be leaking toxic metals, which then get into the aerosols that vapers inhale..."

Aerosol metal concentrations tended to be higher for e-cigarettes with more frequently changed coils, suggesting that fresher coils shed metals more readily. But as now this practices had set a trend in front of all, the teens and even middle schoolers got a habit to try e-cigarettes and to show their ultimate talent of vaping. The e-liquid is not only cheap and less irritating to the throat and lungs, but users also have an option to choose from wide range of flavors and nicotine strengths.


More research is planned to determine possible health effects.

E-liquid is relatively cheap, and the vapor generally doesn't linger like smoke and bother others.

The FDA does not now regulate e-cigarettes but has the authority to do so, the study authors noted.

Researchers at John Hopkins University asked 56 daily e-cigarette users - recruited from vaping shops and conventions around Baltimore - to lend them their tank-style devices.

The next step, Rule said in a release from Johns Hopkins, is to get to the bottom of whether these metals are harmful or not - and to present that data to regulators so they can make informed decisions. "We found lower concentrations in e-cigarettes for cadmium and arsenic".

Rule and her team are now planning further studies of vaping and metal exposures, with particular attention to their impacts on people.

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