Public Health Officials: E. coli Infections Linked to Romaine Lettuce from Arizona

Public Health Officials: E. coli Infections Linked to Romaine Lettuce from Arizona

Public Health Officials: E. coli Infections Linked to Romaine Lettuce from Arizona

After the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a connection between a multistate E. coli outbreak and romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, leading industry groups have offered their deepest sympathies to those affected.

The CDC didn't identify a grower or provider, but it recommends throwing away chopped romaine lettuce from the region and not buying any without knowing its origin.

The New Jersey Department of Health said there are seven cases of E. coli reported in New Jersey.

So far, the CDC reports 17 people have been affected in Washington, Idaho, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and CT.

The CDC will provide the public with more information as it becomes available. Ill people range in age from 12 to 84 years, with a median age of 29. Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.

Photo A romaine lettuce field near San Luis, Ariz. Restaurants and retailers are not advised to avoid serving or selling any particular food.


The CDC is also advising consumers to ask if the lettuce was transported from Yuma, Arizona, when purchasing or eating it at a restaurant.

A case of E.coli has been linked to 35 cases of sickness reported in several states, including two in CT.

Health experts are holding their breath in the midst of a risky food-borne bacterial outbreak that has sickened many people but so far has not caused any deaths.

Most healthy people said the chopped romaine lettuce was an ingredient in a restaurant salad. If you have some of the lettuce, or aren't sure where yours comes from, throw it out.

People who have been infected with E. coli bacteria can show symptoms like bloody diarrhea, vomiting and stomach pain, but will often recover within a span of a week.

Health officials are investigating a Panera Bread in Phillipsburg, New Jersey after a cluster of E. coli illnesses were reported.

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