Syria attack 'very soon or not so soon at all!'

Syria attack 'very soon or not so soon at all!'

Syria attack 'very soon or not so soon at all!'

The President will meet with his national security team at the White House on Thursday for further discussions on the USA response.

British Prime Minister Theresa May was due to hold an emergency cabinet meeting amid speculation she will support USA action against the Syrian regime.

In the call, the two leaders had agreed that the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad "had established a pattern of risky behaviour in relation to the use of chemical weapons", Downing Street said.

Following the meeting, May spoke to Donald Trump and the pair agreed that the United Kingdom and the U.S. would "keep working closely together on the worldwide response", according to a statement from Downing Street.

France has proof that the Syrian government launched chlorine gas attacks and has crossed a line that could prompt French airstrikes, President Emmanuel Macron said Thursday.

That prompted Mr Trump to tweet: "Russia vows to shoot down any and all missiles fired at Syria".

Addressing the Security Council, Haley laid out Washington's case for resorting to force, challenging Russia's claim that military action would be in violation of global law.

A joint military operation, possibly with France rather than the U.S.in the lead, could send a message of worldwide unity about enforcing the prohibitions on chemical weapons and counter Syria's political and military support from Russian Federation and Iran. France is already involved in the US -led coalition created in 2014 to fight the Islamic State group in Syria and Iraq.

Liberal Democrat leader Sir Vince Cable told the BBC: "Parliament can and should be recalled immediately and a vote held on this issue".


Corbyn has also evoked memories of the Iraq War, when lawmakers approved joining in the face of strong public opposition. A YouGov poll showed just one in five members of the public support a strike on Syria.

Formally, the prime minister has the right to go to war without approval from parliament, but a convention has been established in previous conflicts where MPs have a vote either before or shortly after military action begins.

Twenty-one percent of the respondents said they did not know if it was necessary to hold a parliamentary vote on whether London should engage in the military actions against Syria.

But they backed action in Iraq the following year, and again in Syria in 2015, strictly limiting strikes to Islamic State (IS) group targets.

British lawmakers voted down taking military against Damascus in 2013, in what was widely viewed as an assertion of parliamentary sovereignty on the use of force.

"We continue to consider it extremely important to avoid any steps that could lead to more tension in Syria", Mr Peskov said.

"France will shoulder its responsibility to end an intolerable threat to our collective security", he added, before calling for an end to the "chemical weapons escalation in Syria".

Mattis addressed a hearing of a House of Representatives committee on Thursday.

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