Apple may become 'the Netflix of magazines' with paid-subscription News makeover

Apple may become 'the Netflix of magazines' with paid-subscription News makeover

Apple may become 'the Netflix of magazines' with paid-subscription News makeover

Now sources speaking to Bloomberg claim the company has plans to integrate it with News within the next 12 months, as part of a push to generate more money from online products and services.

From 2011 to 2012, Apple and News Corp. - which owns The Times of London, the Wall Street Journal and Fox Broadcasting Company - launched The Daily, the first iPad-only news app.

The Cupertino company now offers access to a variety of news services through its Apple News app, however, many of these require individual subscriptions. With smartphone sales suffering a small decline in shipments previous year, the first time that has happened, Apple is looking to expand its services revenue. Then, within the next year, Apple is expected to launch "an upgraded Apple News app with the subscription offering", and some of the revenue generated from the subscriptions will be distributed to the magazine publishers participating in the program.

Apple is planning to launch a subscription based News service that will include access to magazines now offered by Texture, reports Bloomberg. This very same team is the one that's now building the new premium subscription service for Apple.

Apple shares are rising Tuesday after Bloomberg reported the company is launching a subscription news service.


Apple needs successes like that to meet a bold target for its services division.

Paid subscriptions already play a huge part in Apple's ecosystem.

Currently, Apple sells subscriptions for iCloud storage and Apple Music.

There will be some sort of revenue split between Apple and the publishers who will be featured in the service, but there's no details on that. Users can also subscribe for free to content to always see the latest from a respective publication.

Job reductions at Texture aren't necessarily a sign that the news subscription effort is off to a slow start. The company also laid off 20 former Texture employees after its acquisition, according to Bloomberg. Texture previously had about 100 staff members.

Related news



[an error occurred while processing the directive]