After Gallagher's High Court dual citizenship decision: Sharkie, Keay, Wilson, Lamb resign

After Gallagher's High Court dual citizenship decision: Sharkie, Keay, Wilson, Lamb resign

After Gallagher's High Court dual citizenship decision: Sharkie, Keay, Wilson, Lamb resign

Four Labor MPs were forced out of Parliament yesterday because of citizenship issues, after Mr Shorten had repeatedly declared his party did not have a problem with dual citizens.

His resignation follows that of Katy Gallagherafter the High Court ruled the duo, plus Sussan Lamb, Rebekha Sharkie and Justine Keay, were dual citizens and did not take all reasonable steps to renounce their citizenship.

There will be a total of five by-elections, because Labor's Tim Hammond resigned for family reasons.

Opposition leader Bill Shorten backed his colleague to bounce back.

Late past year, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull called yet another inquiry into Section 44 of the Constitution to see if changes should be made to either make it easier to renounce dual citizenship or whether the requirement should be deleted.

"If Labor was to lose that, it'd be a huge fillip for Turnbull", Economou said.

Ms Gallagher, who said she was disappointed but accepted the court ruling, will be replaced by another Labor politician in the Senate.

There will be two by-elections in Western Australia.


Ms Lamb said she meant to recontest her seat.

He said the MPs should not take their seats in the parliament for question time at 2pm (AEST), and did not rule out fining the MPs or forcing them to pay back their salaries for sitting in parliament unlawfully. But she respected court's decision. It was an absolute honour to hold elected office, she said.

" I am putting the government on notice that, ultimately while this decision lays in the hands of the incredible people of Longman, I intend to be back".

Porter said for Shorten to claim it was a reinterpretation was "talking absolute rubbish".

Pauline Hanson all but confirmed One Nation would run a candidate in the seat, which attracted a 10 per cent One Nation vote in 2016.

Attorney-General Christian Porter has taken the hard line, stating that the decision was a "crisp and crystal clear clarification of the law", and called for the MPs resignation today.

She had argued to the High Court that she had taken all reasonable efforts to renounce her citizenship and that the failure of the British Home Office to process her renunciation prior to nomination did not prevent her being from constitutionally eligible even under the High Court's much stricter reading of section 44 of the constitution enunciated a year ago. Shorten said Labor would now consider the implications of the decision.

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