California marks record high STD's in 2017

California marks record high STD's in 2017

California marks record high STD's in 2017

"More than 300,000 cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and early syphilis were reported: a 45% increase compared to five years ago", wrote the authors.

Chlamydia and gonorrhea were the most rampant among people under 30, with rates of chlamydia highest among young women.

The California Department of Public Health revealed in a report released on Monday a dramatic increase in sexually transmitted diseases in the Golden State.

CDPH noted that 2017 was the "fifth consecutive year for increases in the number of infants born with congenital syphilis", and that there were 278 congenital syphilis cases, including 30 stillbirths, in California last year.

Sexually transmitted disease (STD) cases have reached record-high numbers in California, the Los Angeles Times reports.

"STDs are preventable by consistently using condoms, and many STDs can be cured with antibiotics", said CDPH Director Dr. Karen Smith. Both campaigns drive the public to AHF's www.FreeSTDCheck.org website to learn more about the disease and find locations to access free STD testing and affordable care for the treatment of gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis through AHF.

The most reported sexually transmitted bacterial infections in the state, chlamydia and gonorrhea typically don't have symptoms but can cause problems including pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility, according to CDPH.


In California, 75,450 gonorrhea cases were reported in 2017, marking it the highest number since 1988.

Gonorrhea is a very common infection, especially among young people ages 15-24.

Rates for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis have been rising nationally for several years.

"We've known how to control syphilis since early 1900's". You can get syphilis by having direct contact with a sore.

The report details how many cases were diagnosed in California in 2017. In women, it can also be passed to the baby, called congenital syphilis and can result in stillbirth, early death, or long-term infection. The syphilis rate for African-Americans were two times higher.

If left untreated, the STD can lead to loss of vision, brain disease, and hearing problems. Officials with the San Francisco Department of Public Health believe recent advances in HIV prevention drugs may have led to an increase in unprotected sex in some communities, possibly increasing STD rates.

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