Suicidal Thoughts, Attempts On The Rise Among Young People: 'It's A Critical Public-Health Crisis Right Now'

Suicidal Thoughts, Attempts On The Rise Among Young People: 'It's A Critical Public-Health Crisis Right Now'

Suicidal Thoughts, Attempts On The Rise Among Young People: 'It's A Critical Public-Health Crisis Right Now'

The number of teens hospitalized for suicide ideation or suicide attempts almost doubled between 2008 and 2015, with the highest increase seen in adolescent girls, a study found. While increments were seen overall age gatherings, they were most noteworthy among adolescents ages 15-17, trailed by ages 12-14.

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The annual percentage of hospital visits for suicide ideation and suicide attempts nearly doubled among USA children from 2008 to 2015.

The rates of death among the groups were highest in the fall and spring, and lowest in the summer.

It's unclear exactly why more teens are contemplating suicide and self-harm.

Suicide is the third leading cause of death among adolescents in the United States, preceded only by accidents and homicides, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


During the study period, researchers identified 115,856 encounters for suicide ideation and attempts in emergency departments at 31 children's hospitals.

The researchers also analyzed the data on a month-by-month basis in order to establish seasonal trends in hospital visits.

They examined data from the Pediatric Health Information System database, with clinical and billing data from 49 US children's hospitals. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), that child and adolescent mental health care remains "inadequate", and that research has indicated that emergency departments and acute care hospitals should offer a "safety net" for youth that experience suicidal ideation or suicide attempts.

Plemmons and his colleagues said in the Pediatrics study that it is possible that physicians are paying more attention and sending kids to specialist hospitals because they don't feel equipped to deal with suicidal thinking.

The majority of the encounters were girls, and a little over half of the encounters occurred among teenagers ages 15 to 17.

The study lead author Greg Plemmons, M.D., associate professor of clinical paediatrics at Vanderbilt University, said, "To our knowledge, this is one of only a few studies to report higher rates of hospitalization for suicide during the academic school year". The number of incidents in October was double that as reported in July and the researchers say this could be because of the challenges and stresses of school.

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