22,000 children are severely obese when they leave primary school

22,000 children are severely obese when they leave primary school

22,000 children are severely obese when they leave primary school

The figures have shown that 23.6 per cent of year six children London-wide are obese and 10.3 per cent in reception are obese.

The number of 10 and 11-year-olds classed as severely obese in the final year of school is almost double that of those in reception, new figures have revealed.

The MPs' report comes after figures showed that one in 25 children aged 10 or 11 in England were now classed as "severely obese".

Severe obesity is measured in adults with a BMI of 40 or above, at least 60% higher than the upper healthy BMI limit of 24.9.

The Committee calls for targets to improve rates of breastfeeding, to combat childhood obesity, and urge a full and timely implementation of all of the school-centred measures contained in the original 2016 Child Obesity Action Plan.

"The overconsumption of HFSS products contributes to high levels of childhood obesity and tooth decay, and our children are paying the price of this irresponsible marketing".

The first data of its kind for 2016/17, supplied by the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP), shows a total of 22,646 out of 556,452 (4.1%) of 10 and 11-year-olds in Year 6 are classed as severely obese.

The LGA also emphasised the need for "targeted intervention" to tackle disproportionately high rates of obesity among children in the most deprived areas, and those from minority ethnic groups.

It would mean characters like Tony the Tiger and the Milky Bar Kid would have to be dropped or used to promote healthier products.


But the LGA said such prevention work, including the ability of councils to provide weight management services for children and adults, is being hampered by a £600m cut to local authority public health budgets between 2015-16 and 2019-20.

The Government must change the narrative around childhood obesity to make it clear that this is everyone's business, say the Health and Social Care Committee in their report into childhood obesity.

But the LGA warned essential prevention work, including the ability of councils to provide weight management services for children, is being hampered by an 800 million US dollar reduction in councils' public health budgets by Britain's central government.

Izzi Seccombe, the chairwoman of the LGA's community wellbeing board, said: "Unless we tackle this obesity crisis, today's obese children will become tomorrow's obese adults".

The LGA also wants councils to have a say on how and where the soft drinks levy is spent.

Despite this, councils are spending more on schemes to help children stay healthy, which is key to tackling child obesity and the knock-on costs to hospitals, health and social care services.

"This short-sighted approach risks causing NHS costs to snowball due to the ill health consequences of obesity in our younger generation".

More children in Cumbria are starting school overweight than anywhere else in England.

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