Sen. Collins: No Roe v Wade opponent for high court

Sen. Collins: No Roe v Wade opponent for high court

Sen. Collins: No Roe v Wade opponent for high court

CNN host Jake Tapper pointed to criticisms on the left suggesting Collins could be "played" by supporting conservative nominees who could potentially still vote to overturn Roe v. Wade, even if they hadn't "demonstrated hostility" to the program in the past. Collins, who appeared on ABC's "This Week" and CNN's "State of the Union," said she would only back a judge who would show respect for settled law such as the Roe decision, which has always been anathema to conservatives.

With little more than a week before President Donald Trump announces his nominee to the highest court in the land, Trump sought to downplay some of his past comments about making opposition to legalized abortion a litmus test for his Supreme Court nominees.

"Well, I hope they keep thinking about it", Trump said of Democrats like Sen.

Roe v. Wade, a landmark case for abortion rights, has been a major concern for some following the abrupt retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. Republicans now hold a 51-seat majority in the Senate, and a Supreme Court nominee will be confirmed by a simple majority of votes. Susan Collins said a nominee's position on the abortion decision will be crucial to her vote.

In March 2017, Collins endorsed Trump's first Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, who replaced the late Justice Antonin Scalia.


"The person chosen will be outstanding", Trump said.

Florida's senior senator said his decision will depend on Trump's nominee, but the president already has released a short list of 25 prospective justices who were reviewed by the conservative Federalist Society. "And that would indicate to me a failure to respect precedent, a fundamental tenet of our judicial system".

"It's probably going to be vicious because the other side, all they can do is obstruct and resist", Trump said in an interview with Fox Business that aired Sunday. Collins said she would only back a judge who would show respect for settled law such as the Roe decision, which has always been anathema to conservatives. But he told reporters on Friday that he would not question potential high-court nominees about their views on abortion, saying it was "inappropriate to discuss".

"So I'm actually quite happy about it", he said. "If they vote for somebody who is going to change [legal] precedent, it could be a career-ending move". Yet as a judge in the military courts rather than civilian, Ryan has little track record of rulings on hot button issues that give Democrats the fodder to hold up or outright oppose her confirmation.

In the current political climate, where Supreme Court nominations is a highly polarizing process, more campaigning and money is needed for groups that would like to curry favor with the public.

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