Kremlin Calls Russian Link To Novichok Death 'Quite Absurd'

Kremlin Calls Russian Link To Novichok Death 'Quite Absurd'

Kremlin Calls Russian Link To Novichok Death 'Quite Absurd'

LONDON - Russia has committed an attack that resulted in the death of a Briton, defence minister Gavin Williamson said on Monday, linking Russia to the incident after a 44 year-old woman who was poisoned by nerve agent Novichok died.

As previously reported, Dawn Sturgess and her 45-year-old companion Charlie Rowley were hospitalized on June 30 in a critical condition. May also said her "thoughts and condolences" go to Sturgess' family and loved ones.

Salisbury District Hospital also treated Mr Skripal, 67, his daughter Yulia, 33, as well as police officer Nick Bailey, who fell ill after he came to assist them.

It was confirmed on Wednesday both Sturgess and Rowley were exposed to Novichok. Russian Federation has repeatedly urged London to conduct a proper and transparent investigation and dismissed baseless allegations of its involvement.

Russian Federation is "deeply concerned by the continuing appearance of these poisonous substances on British territory", which "present a danger not just for the British but for all Europeans", Peskov said.

"I simply can not offer any guarantees", Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu, the head of Britain's counter-terror police, which is leading the investigation, told reporters, emphasising that public health authorities had said the risk was "low". Yulia said that the poisoning had turned her life "upside down" and that she and her father were "lucky to have survived this assassination attempt".

"Over the weekend, detailed searches have continued at a number of locations in Amesbury and Salisbury". "Our focus and priority at this time is to identify and locate any container that we believe may be the source of the contamination". She said: "The staff here at Salisbury District Hospital worked tirelessly to save Dawn".

On Monday, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Russian Federation was sorry to learn of the death of Sturgess, but that any suggestion that Moscow was involved in the death is "quite absurd".

They are not showing any signs of having been exposed to the nerve agent, and are being screened as a precaution.


Russian Federation is "deeply concerned by the continuing appearance of these poisonous substances on British territory", which "present a danger not just for the British but for all Europeans", Peskov added.

Public Health England said the risk to the general public "remains low".

Britain's interior minister Sajid Javid said earlier on Sunday that police were still working to discover how the two individuals were exposed to the nerve agent.

"Following tests, no traces of the nerve agent have been identified on the bus".

The police officer added: "The investigation must be led by the evidence available and the facts alone".

Police don't know at the moment how Sturgess, 44, and Charlie Rowley, 45, were exposed to Novichok.

Britain has blamed Russian Federation for the poisonings, but Moscow has strongly denied any involvement.

Britain "understands that direct dialogue between the two superpowers is capable of reducing the level of confrontation, gradually raising the level of trust between our countries, and destroying the lies fabricated against Russia", Zheleznyak said in July 9 comments released by his party.

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