Facebook takes down suspected Russian network of pages

Facebook takes down suspected Russian network of pages

Facebook takes down suspected Russian network of pages

Facebook said those behind the campaign had been "more careful to cover their tracks, adding: "We've found evidence of some connections between these accounts and IRA accounts we disabled previous year (.) but there are differences too". However, company officials told Capitol Hill that Russian Federation was possibly involved, reports The Times.

However, the company says it's banned 32 "bad actors" that violate Facebook's ban on coordinated inauthentic behavior.

Facebook has identified a coordinated political influence campaign through dozens of inauthentic accounts on its platform ahead of November's USA midterm election, it announced Tuesday.

"We don't have all the facts, but we'll work closely with others as we continue our investigation, " Facebook, the social media giant, said. Facebook said it has found some connections between the accounts it removed and the accounts connected to Russia's Internet Research Agency that it removed before and after the 2016 USA presidential elections.

"The set of actors we see now might be the IRA with improved capabilities, or it could be a separate group", explained Facebook's chief security officer Alex Stamos.

Facebook also announced it would start notifying users who were interested (around 2,600) and users who said would attend events (around 600) created by one of the suspended accounts and pages.

Having been publicly embarrassed and then excoriated for its failure to identify a massive misinformation campaign last time around, Facebook has expanded its security team, hiring several serious counterterrorism experts, and introduced new rules included the requirement for political advertisers to register with a U.S. addresses.

Among the deleted pages was one called "Resisters", which had created a Facebook Event - "No Unite the Right 2-DC" - a counterdemonstration to Unite the Right 2-DC, which had been called by the ultraright for August 12 in Washington.

Facebook says more than 290,000 accounts followed at least one of the fake pages.

According to preliminary results of its investigation, Nathaniel Gleicher, Head of Cybersecurity Policy at Facebook, said these accounts had been created between March 2017 and May 2018.


"This kind of behaviour is not allowed on Facebook because we don't want people or organisations creating networks of accounts to mislead others about who they are, or what they're doing".

Samples of the inauthentic activity.

Facebook says the pages ran about 150 ads for $11,000 on Facebook and Instagram, paid for in US and Canadian dollars.

Facebook says it has found some connections between the accounts it removed and the accounts connected to Russia's Internet Research Agency that it removed before and after the 2016 U.S. presidential elections.

The examples Facebook provided Tuesday of erased content did not support or attack any specific elected officials or parties.

After being caught flat-footed by the Internet Research Agency's efforts to use social media to sow division ahead of the 2016 presidential election, Facebook is trying to avoid a repeat disaster in 2018.

One of the administrators for a fake account was associated with "known IRA assets", whose access to Facebook was terminated seven minutes later.

A Russian propaganda arm tried to tamper in the 2016 United States election by posting and buying ads on Facebook, according to the company and United States intelligence agencies.

But company officials told lawmakers during a series of hearings on Capitol Hill that Russian Federation was possibly involved.

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