Fortnite for Android Will Bypass Google’s Play Store

Fortnite for Android Will Bypass Google’s Play Store

Fortnite for Android Will Bypass Google’s Play Store

"On open platforms like PC, Mac, and Android, Epic's goal is to bring its games directly to customers". Whether or not this will come to fruition remains to be seen, but for a phone maker with declining sales looking to make a splash, Samsung turning the Galaxy Note 9 into the exclusive home of the biggest game in the world is a smart play. The primary reason Epic turned to the iOS App Store is that Apple does not allow the distribution of iOS apps through unverified channels. Initial reports peg the exclusivity deal between Epic Games and Samsung at 30 days, but a new report states the exclusivity could last as long as an extra 3 months.

On Monday we reported that Epic, the creator of popular Battle Royale title Fortnite, could be planning to circumvent the Google Play Store with the game's Android release.


The developer of Fortnite has confirmed it will bypass the Google Play app store when the game is released for Android smartphones. While Fortnite made its mobile debut on iOS earlier this year, Apple is notoriously more strict about games hosted outside of its official App Store and that's likely why the game took a more traditional route on iOS. That will be very disappointing for the many Android device owners who will miss out on the Fortnite fun, but for the 12% whose devices will be capable of running the game, this could benefit them immensely.

Furthermore, Sweeney calls the 30 percent "store tax" a "high cost" in the game industry, particularly given the fact that Android is an open platform where Google is not distributing or managing all hardware, like Microsoft and Sony do with their respective consoles. Basically, players on Android devices will head to the Fortnite web site at which point you tap a button to download the Fortnite Installer.apk file. A few cheap ads promising some free in-game experience points and skins is all it will take to attract users to fake downloads in droves. "Why not just make the game available direct to users, instead of having the store get between us and our customers and inject all kinds of cruft like that?" argued Sweeney. That's not the case on Android, though, which lets you install apps from unknown sources fairly easily. Samsung may also decide to distribute it through the Galaxy Apps store. The game has already proven itself to be insanely successful, not only by finding its way onto millions of devices around the globe but also by managing to rake it more than $100 million in revenue in the time that it's been offered. Sweeney doesn't seem to anxious about this, saying that "Gamers have proven able to adopt safe software practices, and gaming has thrived on the open PC platform through many sources".

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