North Korea threatens to keep nukes

North Korea threatens to keep nukes

North Korea threatens to keep nukes

North Korea accused the United States on Thursday of pushing for worldwide sanctions despite goodwill moves by Pyongyang and said that progress on denuclearisation promises could not be expected if Washington continued to follow an "outdated acting script".

The foreign ministry in Pyongyang accused the United States of following an "outdated acting script" and demanded more concessions before offering any in return.

The two Koreas, who agreed to increase sports exchanges at a landmark summit between the South's President Moon Jae-in and the North's leader Kim Jong-un in April, held a friendly basketball match in Pyongyang last month.

It will mark the fourth such football match between North and South Korean workers, with the last game taking place in Pyongyang in 2015.

North Korea's criticism of the United States comes after Trump's national security adviser John Bolton said this week that the administration does not feel Pyongyang is living up to its end of the deal.

Washington has said that sanctions will not be lifted until Pyongyang fully and finally dismantles its nuclear weapons.

The Foreign Ministry passed on the tipoff to the Korea Customs Service, but the shipments had already been registered and 9,156 tons unloaded in South Korean ports. Among the agreements was holding another inter-Korean summit in the fall in Pyongyang.


It wasn't clear who would attend next week's talks, but such meetings have typically been handled in the past by South Korea's unification minister and his counterpart in the North. "Potential locations for the summit are not limited to the North Korean capital of Pyongyang, ." is what the spokesperson for the South Korean Presidential Office said Friday. while fielding questions about the meeting tentatively scheduled for this fall.

The foreign ministry said that despite their efforts to work with the US - by stopping their missile launches and nuclear tests - America continues to insist on "denuclearization first", and continues to encourage worldwide sanctions against the North.

North Korea has called on the United States to reciprocate its "goodwill measures" by easing sanctions and stopping demands that the North denuclearise first, which they branded insulting.

North Korean officials have toured China to discuss economic development and speculators are snapping up property along their common border.

The U.N. Security Council banned North Korea's sale of coal, iron, iron ore, lead, lead ore and seafood in a bid to slash by a third the country's $3 billion annual export incomes, while capping imports of crude oil and refined petroleum products.

Earlier on Thursday, North Korea's Rodong Sinmun said in a commentary that ending the Korean War is "the first process for ensuring peace and security not only in the Korean peninsula but also in the region and the world".

All civilian communication between the two countries, which remain technically at war after the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice instead of a peace treaty, is banned unless approved by the governments.

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