Trump cancels pay raises for federal employees, including 75,500 in Washington

Trump cancels pay raises for federal employees, including 75,500 in Washington

Trump cancels pay raises for federal employees, including 75,500 in Washington

President Donald Trump speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House Wednesday.

But in a letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan on Thursday, Trump wrote, "We must maintain efforts to put our Nation on a fiscally sustainable course, and Federal agency budgets can not sustain such increases".

That measure, along with a new two-year federal budget and tax cuts heralded by Republicans, have led to accusations Trump is ignoring the federal deficit, despite promising he would address it as president. Gerald E. Connolly, who said Trump was "feeling cornered and lashing out by cancelling a modest, planned pay increase for our dedicated federal workforce". That's wrong - and it disrespects the important work done throughout our country by federal workers. Military personnel, unlike civilian federal employees, are still due for a pay increase valued at 2.6 percent, CNBC reports.

The Trump administration proposed $143.5 billion in cuts to federal employee compensation in May, including substantial decreases in retirement funding.

Trump frequently trumpets the military pay raise while listing his administration's accomplishments. Federal News Radio reports that a spending plan approved by the Senate includes a 1.9 percent pay raise for federal employees while the House's own version of the bill does not include such measures.

Trump said the pay raises would cost the federal government $25 billion, and canceling the raises will "put our nation on a fiscally sustainable course".


"Trump has delivered yet another slap in the face to American workers", said Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez.

The pay raise matter was the latest in a string of moves that reflect an attempt to rein in spending on federal employees.

"His tax bill exploded the deficit, and now he is trying to balance the budget on the backs of federal workers", the Virginia Democrat said. The national debt - the accumulation of those budget deficits - has increased almost $1.6 trillion over the past year, to $21.4 trillion.

Under President Barack Obama, federal pay was frozen between 2011 and 2013 as the economy recovered from the Great Recession, and no president has allowed full locality pay increases to take effect, according to Bloomberg. To help offset the pay freeze, the administration has pushed for a $1 billion workforce fund for incentive-based pay, recruiting and retaining employees. We must maintain efforts to put our Nation on a fiscally sustainable course, and Federal agency budgets can not sustain such increases. Trump says he's determined that for 2019 "both across-the-board pay increases and locality pay increases will be set at zero".

"These alternative pay plan decisions will not materially affect our ability to attract and retain a well-qualified Federal workforce", Trump's letter adds. "Across-the-board pay increases and locality pay increases, in particular, have long-term fixed costs, yet fail to address existing pay disparities or target mission critical recruitment and retention goals". He cited the need to put the nation "on a fiscally sustainable course".

The adjustments described above shall take effect on the first day of the first applicable pay period beginning on or after January 1, 2019.

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