Hurricane Florence churns toward Carolinas

Hurricane Florence churns toward Carolinas

Hurricane Florence churns toward Carolinas

Florence's winds had dropped from a peak of 140 miles per hour (225 kph) to 105 miles per hour (165 kph) by midmorning, reducing the hurricane from a terrifying Category 4 to a 2.

He compares Hurricane Florence with Hurricane Isabel, which hit the Virginia and North Carolina area at a similar strength in 2003, leaving about a million people without power and Hatteras Island battered.

"Disaster is at the doorstep and is coming in", North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said.

If you're in the path of this storm, get out of it. Pack your stuff into the attic and your vehicle, grab the preferred kids, pets, and spouse, and head inland.

"The rain's going to be around for a long time", he said. Its new path indicates that after arriving in the area near Wilmington, North Carolina, the storm will dip to the south before resuming a western course, the FWS explained in the statement. "Kind of like Sandy", said George Kourounis, a storm-chaser from Toronto, who is in Wilmington, N.C. Hurricane Sandy formed in the Atlantic in 2012, hitting Jamaica and the Bahamas as a Category 1.

"I'm not approaching Florence from fear or panic", said Mr Brad Corpening, 35, who planned to ride out the storm in his boarded-up delicatessen in Wilmington.

Hurricane Florence's sustained wind speeds have lessened slightly to 105 miles per hour, but the storm is already bringing surges and tropical storm winds to the North Carolina shore, the National Hurricane Center said in an 11 a.m. briefing.

A state of emergency has also been declared in Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Washington. Florence, the most ominous for USA residents, is expected to make landfall today.

Boarding up his home in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Chris Pennington watched the forecasts and tried to decide when to leave.

About 5.25 million people live in areas under hurricane warnings or watches, and 4.9 million live in places covered by tropical storm warnings or watches, according to the National Weather Service.

There will be hurricane-force winds up to 80 miles from the centre of the storm, meteorologists say.


Faced with new forecasts that showed a more southerly threat, Georgia's governor joined his counterparts in Virginia and North and SC in declaring a state of emergency, and some residents who had thought they were safely out of range boarded up their homes.

Despite days of warnings to evacuate, some residents are staying put - even if they don't want to. It is updating its outages in North and SC in real-time. "This is going to be a Mike Tyson punch to the Carolina coast". If heavy rain overflows these pools, it can carry waste into local rivers.

So how are these people preparing? Thinking of the outages likely to come, it also warns to use grills and generators outside - away from doors and windows.

Body surfer Andrew Vanotteren, of Savannah, Georgia, crashes into waves in the surf bolstered by the incoming Hurricane Florence on the south beach of Tybee Island, Georgia.

Florence is now heading for ocean water that has surface temperatures of about 85 degrees, meaning it will most likely strengthen on its way to the East Coast.

Richmond has moved its scheduled home football game this week against St. Francis to the Red Flash's field in Pennsylvania because of Hurricane Florence. Water kills more people in hurricanes than wind does.

Florence is predicted to turn more toward the northwest through Thursday - but then is expected to head more west-northwest and stall a bit over the Carolinas.

A now weakened Category 2 storm, Hurricane Florence still is expected to be "extremely dangerous" and a "life-threatening hurricane" the National Hurricane Center said. Water kills more people in hurricanes than wind, and the rain and storm surge will make Florence extremely unsafe.

"As it tracks towards the United Kingdom it will degrade - it will become an ex-tropical storm".

"'This is not going to be a glancing blow".

"In [regions] where we have known precipitation extremes, we have been able to detect an increase in precipitation extremes due to a warming climate."
Those winds, though weaker, are behind the biggest threats: storm surges and widespread flooding. "It goes well inland".

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